Invasives and the Changing Climate

 Purple loosestrife (Ivar Leidus, en.wikipedia.org). 

Purple loosestrife (Ivar Leidus, en.wikipedia.org). 

     With their ability to quickly adapt to new environments, it's no surprise that invasive species have a leg-up when it comes to climate change. Which is bad news for many U.S. waterways. Sport and commercial fishing, water treatment, tourism and power generation have already been affected by invasive species in many areas of the country, and the Great Lakes alone is looking at a $68 million to $18 billion cost because of invasive Asian carp. 

     And many worry that these costs, and the ecological affects, will only be aggravated by changes to growing seasons and rain patterns alongside increased extreme weather events. For instance, research has found that invasive species, such as purple loosestrife, are better at adapting their flowering schedule to the changing growing season than their native counterparts.

     For the full article from the Michigan State University Extension, click here or on the link available below.