Variable Resources May Favor Invasives

Elodea (E. canadensis). Credit: Kristian Peters, wikimedia.org

Elodea (E. canadensis). Credit: Kristian Peters, wikimedia.org

     A study done in north-eastern France offers support to the theory that invasive plants are often better-adapted to survive and even benefit from fluctuations in resources. Looking specifically at phosphorous availability, and focusing on the invasive species E. nuttallii and E. Canadensis (two types of Elodea) compared to plants native to the region (Callitriche platycarpa, Ranunculus peltatus), the study found that the Elodea species were more adapt at storing excess phosphorus than the native C. platycarpa.

     The study indicates that eutrophication (the process by which bodies of water host an excessive level of nutrients) increases elodea's ability to invade, while simultaneously increasing its ability to compete with native species.

     For the full abstract, click here or on the link available below.